pettyartist:

nevertoooldtolovemuppets:

randommakings:

nevertoooldtolovemuppets:

Believe me when I say, these are the BEST Muppet bloopers ever. Please, please WATCH. You get to watch Frank Oz’s sanity slowly slip away. Priceless.

“Hubba wah?! HUBBA HUBBA HUBBA WAH?! Hubba WAH?!?”

Literally the GREATEST THING I have ever seen! Oh my God, the fact that they stayed in character and kept puppeteering the whole time. I’M CRYING!

The fact that this video now has 8,000+ notes makes me so damn happy.

Praise jesus someone posted this— they’re literally the best.  It’s even funnier when you know what Ma’s voice ACTUALLY sounds like in the movie and then you hear Frank Oz doing essentially a scratchtape version of it for the actual filming.  

(via liamdryden)

What do you think about (young) knitters referring to themselves as “old ladies”?

I think as a historical meaning towards the calling knitters Grannies can be traced back to World War II.

Everyone knitted during that time from young children, boy scouts, former soldiers, women, everyone. When the war was over some people put down their needles forever, or they said they would never knit with the army green colour again. Then a few decades down the line we came into  our disposable textile age. Clothing became cheaper to buy than to make. So the only people who would knit would be the generation before and during World War II when it was cheaper to make clothing than buy it. Younger people would purchase clothing, and then lost the ability to make their own clothing (I know several people who couldn’t even sew a button on a shirt, not to mention the ability to sew a shirt). So the older generation continued this strange hobby, and even though recently more younger people have started knitting, it’s still a cliche.

I find it sexist and agist, because it infers that only old women can knit, when in reality it’s people of all ages and sexes.

I’ve been called a grandma more often than calling myself one, although lets all admit it, we all called ourselves grandmas at the being. I’ve been called a baba, and other grandma names, no matter what geeky thing I made and designed people identified me to the “grandma” stereotype. But as I’ve aged as a knitter, I’ve just noticed that it’s a facet of my personality, I like, just as I like tea, chicken, and slurpees. Knitting is just a part of my personality and life.

(Source: fannishknits)